2015-16: Cathedral, Foothills Beat Favorites on Road

Greater challenges lie ahead, but San Diego Section teams in the Southern California regional playoffs were successful in three of four Open Division quarterfinals games last night.

+The Foothills Christian Knights stunned Mater Dei, dealing the Monarchs their first loss at home in 10 years, 50-46, and moving on to Tuesday’s semifinals and a third shot at Chino Hills, the nation’s No. 1 team.

The 31-0 Huskies defeated Foothills, 106-86, and 85-83, earlier in the season and  their Open quarterfinals, 103-71 victory over Reedley Immanuel tied Chino Hills with the 1995-96 San Francisco Balboa Buccaneers for a state-record, eighteen 100-point games.

Fifth-seeded Foothills (25-4) reversed a 61-53 loss to No. 4 Mater Dei (27-5) five weeks ago, benefitting from the Monarchs 5-for-25 shooting on three-point attempts and closing down low to outrebound their hosts, 34-18.

T.J. Leaf led the winners with 21 points, blocked three shots, and brought down 16 rebounds.

The Knights trailed only at 2-0 and tenaciously kept the Monarchs at a distance in the second half  in the hosts’ big arena game environment of scoring table dasher boards, jumbotron, and almost 2,500 raucous fans.

The Foothills-Chino game will be at Colony High in Ontario Tuesday night at 7.

+Seventh-seeded Cathedral defeated No. 2 Chatsworth Sierra Canyon in overtime, 83-80, in arguably the major boys upset of the postseason.

According to Max Preps, Cathedral was ranked 31st in the state and 156th nationally.  Sierra Canyon was fourth in California and ninth in the country.  Cathedral stood 17th in the state, according to Cal-Hi Sports, while Sierra was fourth.

Complicating the Dons’ bid was the absence 6-11 Brandon McCoy, who was on the bench in foul trouble for all but four minutes of the first half.  Mc Coy, who scored 23 points, led a Dons comeback that had the visitors in front, 73-65, late in the fourth quarter.

Sierra Canyon tied the score at 73 to force the overtime but Cathedral raced to an 83-73 advantage in the extra session and held on.

Cathedral (21-6) now faces the 3 seed, Torrance Bishop Montgomery (27-2), which overcame Los Angeles Westchester, 72-58, in overtime and outscored Sierra Canyon, 78-69, two weeks ago in the Southern Section playoffs.

The fourth-seed Mission Hills girls (29-3) defeated No. 5 Los Angeles Price, 49-45, and get No. 1-ranked West Hills Chaminade in the San Fernando Valley suburb on Tuesday.

Mission Hills is ranked sixth and Chaminade fourth in the Cal-Hi Sports ratings, but the Eagles are second in California and fourth in the country as seen by Max Preps, which ranks the Grizzlies 23rd in California and 99th in the country.

The only Open Division losers from the San Diego Section were the  La Jolla Country Day girls, beaten, 46-39, by host Long Beach Poly.

 

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2015-16: Kearny, St. Augustine Pull Big Road Wins

Despite being seeded in the nether regions of the Southern California regional playoffs, No. 15 Kearny and No. 12 St. Augustine scored significant road victories last night, while most other San Diego Section squads, including all 13 girls’ teams in action, were stowing their gear today.

Kearny (31-3) overcame a 53-47, fourth-quarter deficit to upset No. 2-ranked and host Huntington Beach Edison, 65-58, in Division III.

Martin Tombe’s three-point basket with 21 seconds remaining lifted St. Augustine (23-7) past No. 5 Corona Centennial, 60-59, after the Saints trailed, 42-29, in the third quarter and were down, 59-57, in the final minute.

Following Tombe’s field goal, the Huskies called timeouts at :21, :17, and :11, and never got in position for an offensive thrust.

Coach Mike Haupt’s Saints defenders frustrated the hosts to the point that the game ended with the ball being tipped  into the back court.

Centennial made 22 trips to the free-throw line and converted 10.  Tombe made 3 of St. Augustine’s 5 attempts.

THE MARTIN AND ERIC SHOW

Tombe’s  27 points were complemented by Eric (Vaughn) Monroe’s 15. The four-year varsity veterans were members of the 2012-13, Trey Kell-led Saints, who won the state D-III title.

St. Augustine gets a home game Saturday evening, possibly at a venue other than its 600-seat  Daugherty Gymnasium, against lower seed (13) Eastvale Eleanor Roosevelt (23-8), a 56-55, double-0vertime winner over No. 4 Los Angeles Fairfax.

Kearny has another daunting challenge. The Komets will travel almost 150 miles north through routinely brutal Los Angeles traffic to take on the 7 seed, 25-7 Calabasas Coyotes, who ushered out No. 10 Fresno Roosevelt, 55-52.

St. Augustine and Eleanor Roosevelt faced one common opponent. The Mustangs  were 1-2 against Corona Centennial, winning, 56-55, and losing, 73-61, and 83-55.  The latter was in a Southern Section playoff consolation game.

Meanwhile, there was total devastation in the San Diego Section Girls’ brackets, low-lighted by No. 1-ranked The Bishop’s 57-52 loss to visiting Westlake Village Oaks Christian.

OTHER RESULTS

BOYS

D-I

No. 9 Torrey Pines 50, @Inglewood 66.

D-II

No. 11 Mission Bay 58,  @No. 6 Rancho Santa Margarita 73.  No. 12, Army-Navy 62, @Orange Lutheran 63. No. 13 Poway 58, @No. 4 Los Alamitos 67.

D-III

No. 11 La Jolla Country Day 48, @No. 6 LaVerne Bonita 52.

D-IV

No. 8 El Camino 90, No. 9 Rancho Mirage 66. No. 13 San Marcos 61, @No. 4 Sherman Oaks Notre Dame 69.

D-V

No. 9, Bonita Vista 59, @No. 8 Capistrano Valley Christian 46.  No. 11 Mission Vista 52, @No. 6 Saddleback Valley Christian 53.  No. 14 O’Farrell 46, @No. 3 Temecula Rancho Christian 84.

GIRLS

D-I

No. 10 Santa Barbara 69, No. 7 Torrey Pines 60.

D-II

No. 9 La Cresenta Crescenta Valley 57, No. 8 Mount Miguel 55. No. 10 Manhattan Beach Mira Costa 61, No. 7  Westview 54,    No. 13 Serra 34, @No. 4  Anaheim Fairmont Prep 56.

D-III 

No. 10 Lake Elsinore Lakeside 47, No. 7 Eastlake 38.  No. 14 Horizon 61, @No. 3 Norco 64.  .

D-IV

No. 9 L.A. Notre Dame Academy 66, No. 8 Poway 51. No. 10 La Costa Canyon 45, @7 Newport Beach Corona del Mar 54.  No. 12, Imperial 34, @L.B. St. Anthony 68.

D-V

No. 9 Mira Mesa 35, @No. 8 Sun Valley Village Christian 64. No. 10 Escondido Adventist 34, @No. 7 Cypress Oxford Academy 39.  No. 12, Grossmont 43, @L.A. Price 53.

 

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1921:  Loss Becomes Tie For Coronado

Football was constantly evolving.

Officiating did not seem to be keeping pace.

Sweetwater’s successful onside kick late in the game resulted in the winning touchdown and a tie for first place in the County League in a 20-14 battle with Coronado.

The losing team complained that the Red Devils did not have anyone behind the player who kicked the ball.

The Islanders claimed Sweetwater should have been penalized for being offside and forced to kick again.

The game referee who sided with Sweetwater was Lee Waymire.

The same Lee Waymire, who was Coronado’s coach in 1920 and, after a couple days, reversed his decision, declaring a 14-14 tie and leaving Coronado in first place in league standings.

The San Diego Union reported the following Friday:

“The play was a very peculiar one and Waymire, unquestionably one of the best officials in the section, after making his decision delved into the record (sic) book and consulted football officials, discovering that he was wrong.”

Call it delayed instant replay.

COUNTY PLAYOFF?

Coronado (4-1-1) won the league championship for the sixth year in a row, but loop bosses ordered the Islanders to play Grossmont (4-2) in a postseason winner-take-all.

The decision to play the game came after Grossmont upset the Islanders, 16-13, in the final round of play.

The game apparently was not played.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE LATELY?

John Perry, in his second year as coach at San Diego High, was thought to have a Southern California contending team and one worthy of the 1916 Southern California title team that was declared the national high school champion.

The Hilltoppers defeated Sweetwater, 40-0, in the season opener and then avenged a 1920 playoff loss with a 6-0 victory over Los Angeles Poly on a muddy layout in Balboa Stadium.

A 14-0 loss to powerful Santa Ana was not received well by representatives of the local media, which offered several opinions in stories that did not include bylines.

“Perry Plans Changes in Hilltop Eleven; Desires More Fight” was one headline in the Union following the loss.

“Coach John Perry of the locals plans a complete reorganization of the team,” wrote the author of a piece the following Tuesday morning.  “He expects more fighting spirit.  New tactics, fast training, and snappy playing will be the main points to be harped upon.”

“The feeling seems to be at the Hilltop that the team has the goods for a banner year and what is needed is the jazz, support, and coaching,” was the focal point of another story.

Perry was understandably upset at the criticism following a 48-0 rout of Orange:

“While the game appears a slaughter, San Diego should have compiled a higher result on their opponents, close observers of the game remark.  It is also thought that some of the players are not attending to strict training regulations and stage spasms of over-confidence.”

Writers for the city’s three daily newspapers, Union, Evening Tribune, and Sun, sometimes were paid stringers who were students at the high school and who also wrote for the San Diego High Russ.

One of the writers was Allen McGrew, whose nettlesome presence would be felt by Perry when McGrew continued to correspond for the Union even after he graduated from the Hilltop.

The San Diego High team that faced Santa Ana in Southern California finals, first row, from left: Hobbs Adams, Gordon Thompson, manager Will Hawley, coach John Perry, manager Webster Street, Norton Langford, Howard Williams. Second row, from left: Ed Rawlings, assistant coach Walter Davis, Fred Manning. Center row, from left: Ralph Kennedy, Coney Galindo, Al Schevings, Ken Bowers, John Squires, James Gilchrist. Fourth row, from left: Lawrence Hall, Pete Salinski. Bottom row, from left: Justin Bernnett, Tolkey Johnson, Will Moore, John Fox, Ed Giddings, Kenny Zweiner.

The San Diego High team that faced Santa Ana in Southern California finals, first row, from left: Hobbs Adams, Gordon Thompson, manager Will Hawley, coach John Perry, manager Webster Street, Norton Langford, Howard Williams. Second row, from left: Ed Rawlings, assistant coach Walter Davis, Fred Manning. Center row, from left: Ralph Kennedy, Coney Galindo, Al Schevings, Ken Bowers, John Squires, James Gilchrist. Fourth row, from left: Lawrence Hall, Pete Salinski. Bottom row, from left: Justin Bennett, Tolkey Johnson, Will Moore, John Fox, Ed Giddings, Kenny Zweiner.

OUT OF THE LOOP

Army-Navy couldn’t rely on a four-game County League schedule to complement a full slate of games.

As reported in The San Diego Union,”…through an error at the beginning of the County League the eleven was omitted.”

If that report is to be believed, the person who drew up the County League schedule “forgot” that the Cadets were part of the loop.

Coaches and school bosses at Grossmont, Escondido, and Sweetwater also must have whiffed.

Army-Navy played four games, two against teams from Los Angeles and two against San Diego Junior College.

CIF DROPS HAMMER  

Rules of the Southern California governing body were proving onerous for Army-Navy, abiding by CIF statutes for the first time since the academy went into business in 1910.

Ineligibility would be problematical for the Cadets for years.

Four players were declared ineligible before a game at Hollywood because they had not attended the academy for 10 weeks before the close of school the previous June.

A total of 7 players had been forced to sit this season and Academy boss Capt. Thomas Davis threw in the towel, shutting the program after the 28-6 loss to the Hollywood Sheiks.

The players’ parents had not changed their residences to San Diego addresses when the school year began in September.  The residential rule would be a benchmark with the CIF for generations.

Davis was upset because the rules made no distinction between boarding schools and day schools.  Many of the Academy students come from other states and countries.

SCHEDULE SCRAMBLE

San Diego was forced to look for another opponent after Army-Navy bailed.  The Cavemen scheduled a game against the Alumni (3-0 loss) and another against the USS Charleston (25-7 victory).

The contests were described as “midseason exhibitions” by one publication, but they were played under game rules with full officiating crews and scoring.

Don King’s “Caver Conquest” listed the Hilltoppers’ record at the end of the season as 7-2.

I counted the two midseason games as official, giving Perry’s team an 8-3 record.  That reasoning is based on San Diego’s and other local squads’ often competing against alumni and military teams for years in recognized games.

HILLERS LOOK TOUGH, UNTIL

The Hilltoppers entered the playoffs as one of the favorites in the eight-team postseason.

A 70-0 victory over Montebello was followed with a 20-point fourth quarter in a 48-14 conquest of Los Angeles Manual Arts that forged a rematch with Santa Ana.

The game at 15,000-seat Bovard Field on the University of Southern California campus marked San Diego’s first appearance in the championship game since 1916.

The Hilltoppers took an early, 3-0 lead on Lawrence Hall’s 30-yard field goal before being crushed by the Saints, 34-3.

TOILERS GOT EXTRA YEAR

San Diego received a tremendous boost from the CIF when the rulings were handed down against Manual Arts.

Five Toilers players, including all-Southern California halfback and captain Bill Blewett, had played in the flu-shortened season of 1918.  The Los Angeles City League gave those players another year of eligibility.

The ruling by the Los Angeles circuit did not pass the smell test with the CIF.

SIGNS OF TIME

Residents of La Jolla appealed to the city council to ask the railroad commission to investigate high telephone toll rates charged by the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company.

La Jollans objected to a 10-cent, long-distance toll for calls to San Diego.  Charges escalated based on length of conversations.

National City and Chula Vista, which were paying 5 cents for similar service, also complained.

Artist's conception of Sweetwater High's new campus, open to students in January, 1922.

Artist’s conception of Sweetwater High’s new campus, open to students in January, 1922.

SOUR VINTAGE

John Cantonagonla was cleared of malicious mischief by a local magistrate after Cantonagonla drained 75 gallons of wine onto a street in Little Italy.

The wine belonged to Serafino Romani, the defendant’s brother-in-law.

Justice L.D. Jennings ruled that, because wine is not legally rightful property (this was during prohibition), it is not legally subject to mischief.

It was said there was ongoing friction between the branches of the Romani and Cantonagonla families.

HANGING JUDGE

Walter Coleman, ticketed for driving his motorcycle 43 miles an hour on a city street, pleaded guilty, and served a 60-hour sentence as part of a police crackdown on speeding.

Despite injury Cponey Galindo sc ored 40 points for Hilltoppers.

Despite injury, Coney Galindo was among leading scorers for Hilltoppers.

UNOFFICIAL

Scoring totals in the newspapers always were incomplete or nonexistent.  Kenny Zweiner led San Diego with 51 points, followed by Coney Galindo, who missed the last 4 games with an ankle injury, with 40.

Hobbs Adams scored 35 points, Norton Langford and Justin (Pug) Bennett, 30 each, and  Gordon Thompson, 22.  Eight other Hilltoppers got on the scoreboard.

QUICK KICKS

John Perry moved his team out of the City Stadium after the playoff win over Montebello and practiced several days over the next two weeks on the Coronado Polo Grounds…Perry decided the turf layout at the trans-bay facility would serve the Cavers well in playoff games at USC’s Bovard Field against Manual Arts and, if they advanced, against Santa Ana…”Machines” driven by students and other boosters motored through city streets advertising the Montebello game…Hilltoppers officials weren’t happy that the CIF charged 50-cent admission to the contest with the Oilers, double what San Diego principal Thomas Russell and the school executive council wanted…to boost the gate for a game with Santa Monica each student was given one ticket for personal use and one for sale to another person…the Alumni team that defeated San Diego was organized in two days and included a few members of the 1916 team…Perry, principal Russell, and several players went  North to watch the Manual Arts-L.A. High game for the Los Angeles city title…the Hilltoppers put numbers on their jerseys for the games in Los Angeles…half of game proceeds for the championship went to disabled led war veterans…Red Cross women were selling tickets to the game on city streets…about 10,000 attended Santa Ana’s victory…San Diego halfback Hobbs Adams made the all-Southern California first team…tackles Larry Hall and guard Gordon Thompson were on the second team….

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2015-16 Week 11: Foothills Runs Away With Final No. 1 Rating

Records through Monday, March 7:

Rank Team Record Points Last Poll
1 Foothills Christian (11) 24-4 110 1
2 Cathedral 20-6 96 2
3 St. Augustine 22-7 79 4
4 Kearny 30-3* 77 7
5 Torrey Pines 25-5** 71 3
6 El Camino 27-6 50 5
7 Army-Navy 21-10 42 6
8 La Jolla Country Day 28-5 33 NR
9 Mission Bay 21-8 25 8
10 Poway 24-8 13 9

**Forfeited 73-64 victory over Manhattan Beach Mira Costa Dec. 26.                                    *Forfeited 57-37 victory Dec. 5 over Horizon.                                                                                  Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes, including record: San  Marcos (22-7, 11), Grossmont (22-7, 4); La Jolla (19-11, 2); Bonita Vista (20-12, 1); Helix (19-11, 1).

Eleven media representatives vote, including John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune; Steve Brand (San Diego Hall of Champions), Terry Monahan, Jim Lindgren, Union-Tribune correspondents; Bill Dickens, Adam Paul, EastCountySports.com; Rick Willis, KUSI-TV; Rick Smith, partletonsports.com; Bodie DeSilva, sandiegopreps.com; Lisa Lane, San Diego Preps Insider; Aaron Burgin, fulltimehoops.com.

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2015-16: Boys Hit Road in Southern California Regionals

San Diego’s eternal quest for respect from the Southern Section renews this week with opening rounds of the state regional playoffs.

Respect still is to be earned.

Only one of 15 boys teams is seeded higher than its opponent in the six divisions, Open and I-V, brackets for which were announced yesterday by the state CIF office in Sacramento.2016CIFBasketball

El Camino (27-5)  is eighth in D-IV and plays host to No. 9 Rancho Mirage (30-1) on Wednesday.

San Diego Section girls fared better.

No. 5 Los Angeles Windward (20-6) will visit No. 4 Mission Hills (28-3) in the Open Division, which begins play Friday.

The Bishop’s is top seed in D-I and will take on No. 16 Westlake Village Oaks Christian (20-8) on Wednesday and No. 7 Torrey Pines (22-8) plays host to 10 Santa Barbara (26-4).

No. 8 Mount Miguel (21-11) entertains No. 9 Crescenta Valley and 7 Westview (25-6) receives  10 Manhattan Beach Mira Costa (22-9) in D-II.

No. 7 Eastlake (26-6) plays host to No. 10 Lake Elsinore Lakeside (25-5) in D-III.  No. 8 Poway (19-11) is home to No. 9 Sherman Oaks Notre Dame (16-15) in D-IV.

Thirty squads, 15 girls, 15 boys, will be in action this week.

Boys matchups to watch:

OPEN DIVISION

No. 5 seed Foothills Christian (24-4), seventh-ranked in California and 23rd in the country by Max Preps and fifth in the state by Cal-Hi Sports, gets another shot at Santa Ana Mater Dei (27-4), which beat the Knights, 61-53, a couple weeks ago and hasn’t lost a home game in 10 years. Mater Dei, Max Preps’ state No. 4 and U.S. No. 8, and Cal-Hi Sports’ No. 4, is recovering from one of the worst defeats in school history, 102-54, to Chino Hills in the Southern Section semifinals a week ago. The winner will be “rewarded” with another shot at Chino Hills, the No. 1 team  in the United States.  Foothills lost to the Huskies, 106-86 in December and 85-83 in January and is one of the few to test this squad, which has surpassed 100 points 14 times.  Thomas Jefferson of Brooklyn lost a 91-90 decision and Montverde Academy of Florida was edged, 83-82.   St. Patrick’s of Elizabeth, N.J., also came close but lost, 66-60 and Torrance Bishop Montgomery fell, 71-67. Cathedral (20-6) is seeded seventh and gives the San Diego Section two of the eight Open berths, compared to 4 for the Southern and one each for the Los Angeles City and Central sections.  The Dons will make a 133-mile jaunt to Chatsworth and meet No. 2-ranked Sierra Canyon, a ballyhooed club that Max Preps ranks third in the state and seventh in the U.S. and is coming off a 105-83 loss to Chino Hills.  The 26-4 Trailblazers defeated tough Redondo, 74-70, and Bishop Montgomery, 78-69, in the Southern playoffs and had losses to national powers Oak Hill Academy of Mouth of Wilson, Virginia, 49-48, and Montverde Academy, 81-67.   Cathedral is ranked 28th in the state by Max Preps.

DIVISION III

What am I missing?  Kearny (30-3) has been dismissed as a 15 seed.  The Komets visit second-ranked Huntington Beach Edison (24-9), which played a predominanty Orange County schedule with no great wins and two bad losses, 83-44 to Santa Ana Mater Dei, and 72-52 to Villa Park. Kearny lost one game by forfeit and another when star player Takoda Browne was absent. The Komets are quick, have a decent big man, defend, and hustle at both ends of the court.

Girls matchups to watch:

OPEN DIVISION

Mission Hills (26-3) and La Jolla Country Day (24-5) are the fourth and sixth seeds, respectively, and San Diego has two teams in the elite division, compared to 4 for the Southern and 1 each for the Los Angeles City and Central sections. Day, coached by Terry Bamford, who has taken the Torreys to four state championships, opens at Long Beach Poly (25-4).  The Jackrabbits lost, 72-63, to West Hills Chaminade, the No. 1 seed, in the Southern finals but also hold a 50-39 victory over Chaminade.  The Poly environment shouldn’t bother the La Jolla team, which has been steeled over the years with big games and intersectional schedules.  Mission Hills’ 68-64 win over Day in the San Diego finals elevated the Grizzlies.  They have a home game against No. 5 Los Angeles Windward (20-6).

Other pairings:

BOYS

El Camino (27-5)  is eighth in D-IV and plays host to No. 9 Rancho Mirage (30-1) on Wednesday.

San Diego Section girls fared better.

No. 5 Los Angeles Windward (20-6) will visit No. 4 Mission Hills (28-3) in the Open Division, which begins play Friday.

The Bishop’s is top seed in D-I and will take on No. 16 Westlake Village Oaks Christian (20-8) on Wednesday and No. 7 Torrey Pines (22-8) plays host to 10 Santa Barbara (26-4).

No. 8 Mount Miguel (21-11) entertains No. 9 Crescenta Valley and 7 Westview (25-6) receives  10 Manhattan Beach Mira Costa (22-9) in D-II.

No. 7 Eastlake (26-6) plays host to No. 10 Lake Elsinore Lakeside (25-5) in D-III.  No. 8 Poway (19-11) is home to No. 9 Sherman Oaks Notre Dame (16-15) in D-IV.

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2016: Jerry Ralph is Most Traveled Head Coach

Jerry Ralph made history earlier this week when he was announced as the head football coach at El Camino High in Oceanside, becoming the first to lead five different San Diego Section programs.

Ralph has compiled a 123-76-2  (.614) record in 18 seasons, beginning in 1997 at Santana, followed by stints at St. Augustine, Del Norte, and Hoover.

Willie Matson (184-132-6, .581) also has had five head coaching assignments, but two were at the same school.  Matson began at Mission Bay in 1984 and returned there in 2005.

Matson is still active, ranking 12th all-time in number of wins.  Ralph is 30th.

Dave Gross (106-123-3, .464) also was a five-time head coach, including two tenures each at Imperial and El Cajon Valley.

Ralph had shared the lead with Monte Vista’s Ron Hamamoto, who also guided programs at University, Rancho Bernardo, and Lincoln. Hamamoto is eighth on the career list with 203 victories.

Gil Warren and Walter (Bud) Mayfield also had four head coaching tenures.

Warren began at Castle Park in 1967 and returned there in 1992 and also was  at San Diego Southwest and Olympian.

Mayfield began at Coronado in 1979 and was reappointed there in 1989 and again in 1993.  Sandwiched between his runs at Coronado was a year stay at University in 1981.

See list of Coaches with a minimum of 100 wins here.

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2015-16 Week 10: Playoffs Open on Quiet Note

Open Division teams, representing the elite of San Diego Section basketball as determined by the power ratings system, don’t get under way in the  playoffs until Friday (Girls) and Saturday (Boys).

Divisions I-V begin play tonight (Girls) and tomorrow (Boys).

Several factors go into the power ratings, administered by assistant commissioner John LaBeta, who heard some complaints regarding North County teams, which receive the majority of coverage in The San Diego Union-Tribune.

.El Camino boys coach Tom Tarantino thought the Wildcats should have been in the Open Division.  His team defeated Open No. 5 seed Army-Navy, 64-53.

In defense of the ratings, Army-Navy was 7-3 in intersectional play.  El Camino was 2-5. In Max Preps’ extended, computerized ratings, Army-Navy is ranked 63rd in California, El Camino 84th.

One of El Camino’s out-of-section losses was 65-52 to Temecula Valley, a team Army-Navy defeated 77-71.

The Mission Hills girls, ranked sixth in the state by Cal Hi-Sports, were seeded fourth in the open division.

The Grizzlies are 5-1 against the best girls’ teams in the area, La Jolla Country Day (state No. 7, according to Cal-Hi Sports), The Bishop’s (16th), and Torrey Pines (on bubble).

Working against Mission Hills were its opponents in the  Avocado East, in which the Grizzlies played multiple games against weak opponents.

Unsolicited advice to unhappy coaches:  Play a good, tough nonleague schedule.  You can’t control your league competition.

Boys poll and records through Monday, Feb. 22:

Rank Team Record Points Last Week
1 Foothills Christian (11) 21-4 110 1
2 Cathedral 18-5 93 3
3 Torrey Pines 23-4* 88 2
4 St. Augustine 21-5 82 4
5 El Camino 24-5 58 5
6 Army-Navy 20-8 55 6
7 Kearny 26-3** 42 7
8 Mission Bay 19-7 17 NR
9 Poway 23-6 16 10
10 Grossmont 22-4 15 8

*Forfeited 57-37 victory Dec. 5 over Horizon. **Forfeited 73-64 victory over Manhattan Beach Mira Costa Dec. 26.                               Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.                                   NR–Not ranked.

Others receiving votes, including record:  La Jolla Country Day (24-5, 13), San Marcos (20-6, 9), Escondido (17-9, 3), West Hills (20-6, 2), Rancho Bernardo (19-8, 2).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eleven media representatives vote, including John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune; Steve Brand (San Diego Hall of Champions), Terry Monahan, Jim Lindgren, Union-Tribune correspondents; Bill Dickens, Adam Paul, EastCountySports.com; Rick Willis, KUSI-TV; Rick Smith, partletonsports.com; Bodie DeSilva, sandiegopreps.com; Lisa Lane, San Diego Preps Insider; Aaron Burgin, fulltimehoops.com.

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2015-16 Week 9: Seedings, Playoffs Coming Fast

Assistant commissioner John LaBeta will be up into the early morning hours Saturday and, hopefully after a few hours sleep, at it again when the sun rises.

Basketball’s most important weekend is at hand.

LaBeta is the ratings maven for the San Diego Section.

The regular season ends Friday night and teams will have until midnight to get their results to the CIF office, where LaBeta will make the final ratings computation for the first of three tiers of postseason play: San Diego Section, Southern California Regional, and State championships.

Seedings, brackets, and divisional placements probably will be announced by early afternoon Saturday.

From the Apollo to the Valley, there are 123 boys teams in 23 leagues and 120 girls squads in 22 circuits. The only difference in boys’ and girls’ competition is that ten boys teams play in the Frontier North and Frontier South leagues, while seven girls squads comprise one Frontier League.

LaBeta, commissioner Jerry Schniepp, and other members of the CIF staff are sporting bloodshot eyes  and the beginnings of cauliflower ears from all the time they’re spending in front of their computers and on the telephone this week.

The universal basketball participation demonstrates the game’s popularity. By comparison, in 2015 a total of 83 schools fielded football teams, a sport not favored by all of the section’s institutions.

The ratings system, now an accepted fixture in California prep sports, was altered again this year, hopefully ensuring no repeat of 2015, when girls champion Horizon and boys titlist Escondido were not allowed to proceed beyond the San Diego Section tournament.

Meanwhile, Foothills Christian continues to dominate the Union-Tribune poll and is fifth in the state top 20 as ranked by Cal-Hi Sports. Mission Hills is seventh, La Jolla Country Day eighth, and The Bishop’s 17th in the girls’ top 20.

Boys poll and records through Monday, Feb. 15:

Rank Team Record Points Last Week
1 Foothills Christian (11) 19-4 110 1
2 Torrey Pines 21-4* 86 4
3 St. Augustine 19-5 84 3
4 Cathedral 17-5 85 2
5 El Camino 22-5 62 5
6 Army-Navy 19-7 59 6
7 Kearny 24-3** 38 7
8 Grossmont 21-3 22 9
9 La Jolla Country Day 23-4 18 10
10 Poway 22-5 15 8

*Forfeited 57-37 victory Dec. 5 over Horizon. **Forfeited 73-64 victory over Manhattan Beach Mira Costa Dec. 26.                                                                                                                     Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes, including record:   Mission Bay (18-6, 11), San  Marcos (18-6, 9), West Hills (19-5, 4).

Eleven media representatives vote, including John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune; Steve Brand (San Diego Hall of Champions), Terry Monahan, Jim Lindgren, Union-Tribune correspondents; Bill Dickens, Adam Paul, EastCountySports.com; Rick Willis, KUSI-TV; Rick Smith, partletonsports.com; Bodie DeSilva, sandiegopreps.com; Lisa Lane, San Diego Preps Insider; Aaron Burgin, fulltimehoops.com.

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1963: Playoff Operations Snafu

Who saw the game and who didn’t commanded almost as much attention as Kearny’s semifinals playoff victory over Escondido.

President John F. Kennedy’s death and the resulting week’s postponement generated several more days of pregame coverage by area media outlets and contributed to a building buzz about the game.

And some unforeseen problems.

The estimated attendance of 17,000 was the largest for a high school game here since 20,000 saw the 1949 San Diego-Hoover contest.

The 20,000 figure could have been topped, but at least 2,000 persons didn’t get in and others turned away in frustration.

Only two Stadium gates were open and many fans couldn’t gain entry because sellers had run out of tickets, according to  CIF commissioner Don Clarkson.  A crowd of about 12,000 had been predicted.

Until 10 minutes before kickoff, uniformed guards kept the stadium’s upper deck closed, forcing fans to find end zone seats on the lower level, when excellent midfield seats were available up above.

A decision was made to open the upper deck and fans began streaming in.

No one thought to play the national anthem before the game.  Someone realized the oversight in the first quarter.  Play was stopped, the band played the anthem, and a color guard raised flags.

One competing school is designated the home team for the playoffs, said Clarkson, throwing Escondido under the bus and inferring the CIF had clean hands.

Escondido, 40 miles North,  was an infrequent Stadium visitor. The question wasn’t asked, but in retrospect should all the blame for logistical errors at a major CIF event have been dumped on one of the schools?

I stepped onto the roof of the Balboa Stadium press box in the second quarter and could follow a line of waiting spectators in the alley between San Diego High and the stadium that stretched all the way to Russ Boulevard, a distance of about 200 yards.

KEARNY TO PLAY HOST

Things wouldn’t be the same for the championship, promised Gustav Lundmark, vice principal at Kearny.

“We’ll have all the gates open and plenty of tickets,” said Lundmark.  “We’ll also get the gates open a half hour early, at six-thirty.  This was a mess.”

Commissioner Clarkson also announced that tickets for Kearny-El Capitan would be sold at eight area business outlets.

The finals went off without a logistical hitch.  Attendance was 13,520.

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1963: Death of a President

On Nov. 22, 1963, my address was an apartment at 2742 B Street in the Brooklyn-Golden Hill neighborhood.  It was about 9:30  on a Friday morning.  I had a free day until covering the Escondido-Kearny playoff that night in Balboa Stadium.

I don’t remember if I was watching television or listening to the radio, but within minutes there was a news bulletin: “Shots fired in Dallas.”  Shortly later:  “The President has been hit.”

Not knowing, but dreading the worst, I impulsively got into my car and raced to my parents’ house, all the while talking to myself, imploring, praying the President would be okay.

My parents lived a block from the 94 Freeway, near 47th Street and Federal Blvd.  I arrived to the news that President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated.

HOURS LATER

Friday night was prep night at the Evening Tribune, where we attached far greater importance to high school sports than our rival, The San Diego Union. 

I covered the city’s Eastern and Western leagues.  Colleague Harlon Bartlett chronicled the Metropolitan and Grossmont leagues.  We split the small schools.

On a normal Friday evening we’d return to the office after a game and probably work until 2 a.m., writing stories, captioning photos for the weekly prep picture page, chasing down coaches for quotes or scoring information on missing line scores.

Not so on this surreal Friday.  Football games everywhere had been postponed or canceled.

Everywhere except the National Football League, which decided to go ahead and play on Sunday.  Commissioner Pete Rozelle later said it was the most regrettable decision he had made in his 29-year tenure.

CIF CALLS AUDIBLE

The San Diego Section also apparently was going to play, until Commissioner Don Clarkson announced that the CIF board of managers was  suspending the playoffs for one week.

In announcing the postponement, Clarkson unwittingly revealed that the CIF first had decided to “cancel any rallies or dances before and after the games and still hold the contests.”

Often tone deaf, Clarkson and the CIF bosses had wisely reversed course.

Tribune writer and makeup editor Bob Ortman summoned Bartlett and I to the office and we set about trying to fill a  section and two pages of prep news, with no games or stats to rely on.

It was  a long night, scrambling for copy,  trying to keep my mind on the task at hand, and with little zest for the job.

By Saturday morning we were in the middle of a period of funeral music on all radio stations mixed with television coverage of the events in Dallas and the final good-bye to JFK at Arlington National Cemetery.

Art Preston coached El Capitan.

Art Preston coached El Capitan.

THE GAMES RETURN

Gloom still was in the air, but normalcy had begun to return when the postseason began.

The four semifinalists in the AA playoffs were Kearny, Escondido, Hoover, and El Capitan.

Favored Hoover, which slammed Kearny, 25-0, in the opening game, was knocked out for the second year in a row in  a mild, midweek upset, 27-12, before about 8,500 at Aztec Bowl by coach Art Preston’s tough and resourceful El Cap Vaqueros.

The  tandem of Dave Duncan and Ray Homesley was too much for Hoover. Duncan rushed for 224 yards in 32 carries and scored three touchdowns. Homesley scored once and kicked three extra points.

Birt Slater helmed Kearny.

Birt Slater helmed Kearny.

“We made every stupid mistake in the book,” said Hoover coach Roy Engle. “Our ends must have dropped a hundred passes.”

Preston, who announced before the season that his club would be the worst in school history, declared, “I’m still shellshocked.  We knew we could run on them but I didn’t figure it would go like this.”

The Vaqueros broke from a 7-6 lead at the half, scoring 20 points for a 27-6 lead.  “In the third quarter, the kids on the right side of the line were flat knocking people down,” said Preston.

THE MAIN EVENT

The Escondido-Kearny matchup was the most anticipated since  Escondido visited Balboa Stadium and defeated San Diego, 19-13, in 1960.

Embrey was Escondido mentor. See item below for explanation of these photos.

Embrey was Escondido mentor. See item below for explanation of  photos.

The 9-0 Escondido Cougars were the County’s top-ranked team and considered better than the 9-1 club of 1960.  Kearny (8-1) had recovered from an opening-game defeat and shut out 6 of the next 8 opponents, allowing a total of 15 points.

Escondido quarterback Jerry Montiel sustained a groin injury in the second quarter that restricted his play as a defensive back and was a blow to the Cougars, but Montiel had the Escondido  ahead, 7-0, late in the half  and connected with Mickey Ensley on a 43-yard touchdown strike in the third quarter that tied the game at 14.

Larry Shepard, Kearny’s no-nonsense  field leader, got the Komets on the scoreboard with a four-yard pass to spread end (wide receiver in modern nomenclature) Steve Reina with 12 seconds remaining in the half.

Shephard connected with Reina for two more touchdowns in a 20-point third quarter and directed a brusing running attack that took the steam out of the Cougars.  Steve Jones, Jimmy Smith, and Charlie Buchanan, who rushed for a combined 274 yards, chewed up yardage, and ran down the game clock.

THE FINALS

The Balboa Stadium attendance of 13,520 was less than expected after tickets were made available at several area outlets, but Kearny’s 20-6 win over El Capitan was no surprise.

“Give Shepard the credit,” said Komets coach Birt Slater.  “He called every play out there.”

Shepard attempted only three passes.  At one point, Kearny launched 29 consecutive running plays.

“As much as I love our offense taking credit for our success, I do believe our defense made us a championship team,” said Shepard, who singled out many of his teammates.

Steve Reiona (right photo) gets behind Escondido's Jerry Montiel to score touchdown near end of first half. Touchdown was redemption for Reina (24). Pass (left) pjoto bounced off Reina's shoulder and went high in the air, intecepted on Escondido's five-yard line by Gordon Calac, not pictured.

Steve Reina (right) gets behind Escondido’s Jerry Montiel to score touchdown near end of first half. Touchdown was redemption for Reina (24). Pass (left)  bounced off Reina’s shoulder and went high in the air, intecepted on Escondido’s five-yard line by Gordon Calac, not pictured.

“Bill Carroll (end-defensive back), Jim Smith (running back-DB), and John Erquiaga (center-defensive lineman) played both ways,” said Shepard. “The rest of the defense was made up of Dennis Santiago, Robert Odom. Elton Pollock, Dan Fulkerson, Jeff Henderson, Tom Gadd, and Frank Oberreuter.”

Slater’s team, reminiscent of the San Diego High teams he helped coach in the 1950s, arguably was one of the best ever in the San Diego Section.

PRICE GOUGING?

Students from the competing schools would be charged .50 admission for the championship game, but all others students would have pay $1.25, prompting a complaint by  Birt Slater.

“It’s a game for the whole league, rather than for the two finalists,” asserted Slater, speaking for Kearny’s Western League partners and El Capitan’s Grossmont League associates.

Commissioner Clarkson agreed with Slater.  “But I take my orders from the superintendent and that’s the rule as of now,” said the Don.

THEY WERE AZTECS

The portrait photos of the three men above were taken in 1950, when Art Preston, Birt Slkater, and Bob (Chick) Embrey were among six San Diego State players named to the all-California Collegiate Athletic Association first team.

The three also were on the 1951 team that posted a 9-0 record and defeated Hawaii, 34-13, in the 1952 Pineapple Bowl in Honolulu.

WESTGATE POOR VENUE

The San Diego Section was forced to form a partnership of pigskins and cowhide.

More venues for night football were needed, with only three lighted fields in the city, at Balboa Stadium, La Jolla, and Hoover.

Kearny rolled with ends Bob Odom (left) and Steve Reina and quarterback Larry Shepard.

Kearny rolled with ends Bob Odom (left) and Steve Reina and quarterback Larry Shepard.

New football varsities at Morse and Madison crowded the schedule.

To relieve some of the stress on the illuminated grids and forestall moving games to the afternoon, several city contests were scheduled at Westgate Park, erected in 1958 as the home of the baseball San Diego Padres of the Pacific Coast League.

Westgate was arguably the most beautiful facility in all of minor league baseball.  Repeat, “the most beautiful facility in all of minor league baseball.” Not the game that was being played in the fall.

I took some shots at Westgate as a football facility in one of my Tuesday With The Preps columns.

–There was no football scoreboard, so time was kept on the field.

–Teams could not use the baseball dressing rooms, which meant that halftime meetings were held in dank, dimly-lit tunnels underneath the stands.

–The dressing rooms were unavailable because the Chargers, who practiced at Westgate, occupied one and the Padres used the other for off-season storage.

PEEVISH OFFICIALS
–The third base line hadn’t been removed and often was mistaken for a sideline boundary.

–The football field was laid out from the leftfield corner to the rightfield corner and was a long distance from the fans.

On the day after the column appeared, I received a call from Eddie Leishman, the Padres’ general manager.  Leishman was a prominent figure in the city and had expanded the organization’s community outreach.

“We know this isn’t a football stadium,” Leishman said.  “The schools asked us.  We didn’t ask them.  I’m sorry for the shortcomings, but we’re  not making money ($500 rent per game plus parking and concessions) on the deal as it is.”

The timing was interesting.  No sooner had my call from Leishman ended that I received another from Don Clarkson.

“They aren’t making any money off us,” complained the CIF boss, sounding as if he and Leishman had rehearsed their lines.

“They got a lot maintenance down there,” Clarkson added, referring to the costs of opening and closing the ball yard.  “They have a lot of people working for them at (our) games.”

Mission Valley facility was perfect for minor league baseball.

Mission Valley facility was perfect for minor league baseball.

Sight lines from the grandstand were okay and parking was ample at Westgate.

The overhead view was perfect if you exited the press box and took a potentially unsafe walk along the left field roof.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Another lighted field would become available when Mesa College opened in 1964.

Westgate Park was phased out for football and the Mission Valley edifice was razed after the 1967 season.

The Padres played their final season in the PCL in 1968 at San Diego Stadium, which became home the next year for the Padres of the National League.

WITHER CARNIVAL

The annual City Schools carnival finally ran out of steam.  The 24th and final event was held in 1962, four years after being moved to daylight hours.

St. Augustine coach Tom Carter gets victory ride after upset of Lincoln, 21-7.

St. Augustine coach Tom Carter gets victory ride after upset of Lincoln, 21-7.

Attendance was falling and school bosses didn’t want to deal with recurring rowdyism and violence.

Coaches were generally pleased.  It meant that teams now had the option to schedule a ninth regular-season game.

The Grossmont League still played eight games plus the carnival, which drew 11,000 to Aztec Bowl. Most Metropolitan League teams already had a ninth-game option.

GLOBAL WARMING?

Hoover and Helix battled heat that set a San Diego record of 111 degrees on Thursday, Sept. 27,  and on Friday reached 104 , the fifth highest reading since records began in 1874.

Temperature for the 8 p.m. kickoff on Sept. 28 was at least 100 degrees and the Cardinals and Highlanders responded with a memorable game before about 6,000 persons at Hoover.

The Cards won, 14-13, when Hoover drove 81 yards in the final 4 minutes to score the winning touchdown.

DRESS DOWN

Sweetwater tried to beat the heat when it came out for pregame against visiting Crawford.  The Red Devils wore only shorts, T-shirts, helmets, and cleats.  Crawford still prevailed, 14-0, after the Red Devils donned the rest of their uniforms.

THEY SAID IT

“I don’t how good we’ll be, but that’s the worst we’ve been beaten here in five years.  We’ll get a little better each week, I hope”—Kearny coach Birt Slater after a season-opening, 25-0 loss to Hoover.

“It looks like a long year and a good time to go hunting,”—El Capitan’s Art Preston, assessing Vaqueros’ season prospects.

Art Preston delayed his hunting when Dave Duncan (12) taking pitch from Reed Flory against El Cajon Valley, ignited El Capitan's running game.

Art Preston delayed his hunting when Dave Duncan (12) taking pitch from Reed Flory against El Cajon Valley, ignited El Capitan’s running game.

“It should be as good a game as will be played in the County”–Escondido coach Chick Embrey before the Mar Vista game, which Escondido won, 43-21.

“This is El Foldo week for us.  We do it every year against Helix.  We’re olive masters”–Preston before Vaqueros lost their only regular-season game, 12-9 to Helix

“I couldn’t see in the first half and the staff took over.  Maybe that’s all the better”—Grossmont coach Sam Muscolino, his glasses broken after an errant pass hit Muscolino in the face during pregame of a 13-3 win over La Jolla.

SIGNS OF THE TIME

Police were looking for vandals who scattered hundreds of inch-long roofer’s nails at Glasgow Drive, Armitage, and Aragon streets in Clairemont.

Two tires were punctured on the first police car that responded. A City street sweeper and neighbors swept the area clean.

‘HAWKS DECLARE BORDER WAR     

Madison didn’t do a lot in its first season, with a 3-6 record, but coach George Hoagland’s Warhawks quickly established neighborhood ground rules.

Behind quarterback Al Fitzmorris, Madison defeated 1962 San Diego Section playoff runner-up Clairemont, 12-6, in the clubs’ first meeting in the season’s second week.

KINGDOM FOR A CASTLE

Castle Park, at a cost of $1.75 million on 47 acres, became the third public high school within the Chula Vista city limits.

Principal Ralph Skiles welcomed about 950 graduates of Chula Vista, Hilltop, and Southwest junior highs, plus transfers from Chula Vista and Hilltop highs.

Sweetwater was the first south of the San Diego City Limits, welcoming students in 1909 as National City High.  Chula Vista followed in 1947, Mar Vista in 1950, and Hilltop in 1959.

Crawford's Kenny Rupe, makes open field catch and prepares for open field hit from San Diego defenders Phil Carini, Rob Ortman, and Dennis Maley (from left).

Crawford’s Kenny Rupe, makes open field catch and prepares for open field hit from San Diego defenders Phil Carini, Rob Ortman, and Dennis Maley (from left).

RARITY

Point Loma edged La Jolla, 2-0, in the fourth safety-only game ever played by County teams.

A bad snap from center that sailed out of the end zone gave the Pointers two points in the fourth quarter and they made them stand.

La Jolla’s Greg King attempted field goals from 54, 51, and 41 yards.  The first two fell short by about five yards.  The third attempt, with 21 seconds remaining in the game, was partially blocked.

“If that last one hadn’t been blocked it would have been good,” said Vikings coach Gene Edwards, employing curious logic.

Other 2-0 games (the 1926 contest went into overtime and San Diego was awarded two points for gaining the most yardage):

YEAR WINNER LOSER
1919 San Diego 32nd Infantry
1926 San Diego Glendale
1940 Vista Hoover Sophomores
1958 Vista Palm Springs

CHAIN REACTION

Coronado bid goodbye to the Avocado League and returned to the Metropolitan, of which it was a member from the Metro’s beginning in 1933 until 1954, when the Islanders became part of the new Avocado loop.

Fallbrook moved to the Avocado League from the Palomar and newcomer Orange Glen took Fallbrook’s place in the Palomar.

OCEANSIDE  KING OF CLASS A

Jim Harrison, a 150-pound halfback, ran for 175 yards in 27 carries led a ground attack that gained 374 yards as Oceanside won the Class A title with a 32-13 victory over Poway.

KINGDOM FOR A HOUSE?

Jerry Van Ooyen, a linebacker at Indiana from 1949-51, was named head coach at Ramona.  Van Ooyen had been a real estate salesman in the mountain community for five years.

QUICK KICKS

Doug Mayfield (left) prepares to take position at caisson with other pallbearers

San Diegan Doug Mayfield (left) prepares to take position at caisson with other pallbearers at services for President John F. Kennedy.

 

U.S. Army Specialist 4 Doug Mayfield, who was graduated from Lincoln in 1961 and grew up in the Encanto community, was among the eight military personnel assigned as pallbearers for President Kennedy…the eight, from different branches of the military, escorted Kennedy’s body to his autopsy, to the church cathedral, Capitol Rotunda, White House, and Arlington National Cemetery… just so he wouldn’t be mistaken for a player as he stood behind the defensive line, Escondido coach Chick Embrey wore No. 369 on the jersey of his practice sweats…Hilltop dedicated a new lighted stadium seating about 4,000 in a 6-0 loss to Clairemont…light poles had not been erected, delaying Poway’s  long awaited inaugural game under lights against Ramona in the season’s sixth week…after missing three point after attempts in a 25-0 win, Hoover coach Roy Engle turned to 275-pound Richard Gauthier, who was 2 for 2 including the game deciding conversion in the win over Helix…Kearny halfback Jimmy Smith became a No. 1 draft choice by the Washington Senators out of Oregon and won a landmark antitrust suit against the NFL after a career-ending injury…Kearny end Robert Odom played two seasons with the Dallas Cowboys out of Idaho State… lineman John Erquiaga was a standout at UCLA and Reina was a starting receiver at Oregon….linebacker Tom Gadd later became head coach at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania…Reina died at age 44 of leukemia, and Gadd was struck down by brain cancer at age 55 in 2003, after he  had coached Bucknell to seven straight winning seasons that followed  a period in which the program  had one winning year in the previous 14….

Kearny's Jimmy Smith (left) and El Capitan's Dave Saska led their teams into championship game.

Kearny’s Jimmy Smith (left) and El Capitan’s Dave Saska led their teams into championship game.

University of Arizona coach Jim LaRue huddled with former area prep stars turned Wildcats, from left: Lou White (San Diego), Preston Davis (Lincoln), Thomas Phillips (San Diego), and Dave DeSonia (Clairemont).

University of Arizona coach Jim LaRue huddled with former area prep stars turned Wildcats, from left: Lou White (San Diego), Preston Davis (Lincoln), Thomas Phillips (San Diego), and Dave DeSonia (Clairemont).

Bob Odom (23), with help from billy Bolden (top) El Capitan's Ray Homesley to a halt in Kearny's title game victory.

Bob Odom (23), with help from Billy Bolden (top) El Capitan’s Ray Homesley to a halt in Kearny’s title game victory.

Hoover's Rick Shaw and San Diego's James Snow and Rob Ortman (insets, from left) were featured players in annual tussle.

Hoover’s Rick Shaw and San Diego’s James Snow and Rob Ortman (insets, from left) were featured players in annual tussle.

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