2015, Week 11: Helix Closes Gap with Grizzlies

Helix picked up 4 additional first place votes in this week’s Union-Tribune poll and now has eight, half the total of front running mission Hills, which remained No. 1 for the ninth consecutive week and moved into top 10 in the weekly Cal-Hi Sports‘ state rankings.
 
The Highlanders, ranked 13th by Cal-Hi Sports, have trailed Mission Hills since a 23-19 loss in the opening game  to Scottsdale Chaparral, now ranked fifth in Arizona with an 8-2 record.
 
The regular season ends in the San Diego Section this week the playoffs could lead to and Helix’s and Mission Hills’ meeting in the Open Division championship. 
 
It was a shaky week for teams in the Top 10.  Madison jumped from seventh to fourth, La Costa fell from fourth to eighth,  Cathedral moved from ninth to sixth, and Mission Bay disappeared, perhaps not to be seen again this season.
 
The 8-0 Buccaneers walked into a 41-0 knockout punch by Point Loma, which sustained a 48-0 TKO and fourth-quarter running clock by Madison the week before.
 
RIVALRY?
 
Grossmont is 46-24-1 since 2010 and coach Tom Karlo has fielded a 7-2 this season, but don’t tell that to Helix.
 
The Highlanders won another “battle” for the Musket last week, scoring a 68-16 victory in a series that began in 1951 and has become a Helix runaway.
 
The Scots have won the last 16 meetings by a combined score of 690-177 and hold an all-time lead of 38-18-2.
 
The 52-point margin last week wasn’t the widest. Helix won the Musket game, 56-2, in 1982. 
 
Week 11 poll after 10 weeks of games:
# Team (1st place votes) Points W-L Previous
1.  Mission Hills (16) 231 9-0 1
2. Helix (8) 222 7-1 2
3. St. Augustine 187 7-2 3
4. Madison 136 7-2 7
5. Rancho Bernardo 123 7-2 6
6. Cathedral Catholic 100 5-4 9
7. Carlsbad 57 6-3 NR
8. La Costa Canyon 56 6-3 4
9. San Marcos 37 7-2 NR
10. Westview 36 7-2 5

NR–Not ranked. Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes (record & points in parenthesis): Mater Dei  (8-1, 27), Bonita Vista (7-2, 25), Valhalla (7-2, 15), Oceanside (5-4, 14), Grossmont (7-2, 11), Mission Bay (8-1, 10), Poway (5-4, 9), Granite Hills (8-1, 8), Christian (7-2, 4), Santa Fe Christian (8-1, 2), Point Loma (6-3, 2), Eastlake (4-5, 1).

24 Media and CIF representatives vote each week: John Maffei (U-T San Diego), Steve Brand, Terry Monahan, Don Norcross, Jim Lindgren, Tom Saxe, Rick Hoff (U-T San Diego correspondents), Bill Dickens, Chris Davis (East County Sports.com), Steve (Biff) Dolan,  (Mountain Country 107.9 FM), John (Coach) Kentera, Ted Mendenhall, Bob Petinak (The Mighty 1090), Rick Willis, Brandon Stone (KUSI-TV), Rick Smith (partletonsports.com), Jerry Schniepp, John Labeta (CIF San Diego Section), Bodie DeSilva (sandiegopreps.com), Drew Smith (sdcoastalsports.com), Lisa Lane (San Diego Preps Insider), Raymond Brown (sdfootball.net), R. Pena, C. Smith and Montell Allen (MBASports-SDFNL Magazine).

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1975: Day Football on Saturday?

City schools experimented with a Saturday slate of games for one week.

At the same time it was revealed that the board of education had supplemented schools’ associated student body accounts with $49,000 since the ban on night games began in 1974.

The school board said it hoped to determine whether parents and students would prefer games on the weekend.

Writer Brand saw little difference between Friday and Saturday.

Writer Brand saw little difference between Friday and Saturday.

“The Great Experiment…was neither a success nor a disaster,” wrote Steve Brand of The San Diego Union.

Brand noted that none of the games approached the former Friday night crowds and attendance pretty much equaled that of Friday afternoons.

The switch from night to day was the result of postgame violence at Friday night venues.

The move to day games in 1974 resulted in such a continuing decline in attendance that the city came up with the Saturday plan halfway through this season.

“Economic pressures will force a move (back to Friday night),” said Crawford coach Bill Hall.  “The choices are going back or going broke.”

CITY ROCKED BY “F” WORD

Five games in the Eastern and Western Leagues were forfeited, effectively changing the records of six teams in one of the city’s most widespread instances of the “dreaded administrative glitch”.

Patrick Henry forfeited three games and Hoover and San Diego one each.

Kearny, Point Loma, and Madison were the beneficiaries of Henry’s malfeasance.

San Diego forfeited to Hoover and Hoover forfeited to St. Augustine.

Residential impropriety and academic hi-jinks usually are the reasons for administrative judgment. Both were in effect.

Hoover was peripherally involved in Henry’s forfeits.

Two Cardinals players transferred.

“The parents simply did not want their sons attending Hoover,” said Henry coach Russ Leslie, who thought that his school had jumped through all necessary hoops to make the players eligible.

TAX RETURNS, TOO?

“However, when rumors persisted we asked for and received specific guidelines for change-of-address eligibility,” said Leslie.  “I had never seen them and I’ll bet none of the other coaches have either.”

The procedure requires more than telling the postman you’re moving.

“Some of the items which indicate change of address are changing the address on a driver’s license, on auto registration, on income tax returns, and so forth,” said Leslie.

“If rent was involved, as it was in this case, rent receipts are needed.  They were provided,

Jim Minerd had one of Patrick Henry's few successes in loss to Oceanside. Minerd (top) gathers for second-quarter pass from Steve Fairchild and maintains concentration (bottom) to catch throw that was deflected by disappointed Robin House.

Jim Minerd had one of Patrick Henry’s few successes in loss to Oceanside. Minerd (top) gathers for second-quarter pass from Steve Fairchild and maintains concentration (bottom) to catch throw that was deflected by disappointed Robin House.

but some of the other criteria, which were not even known to me, were not,” Leslie added.

The two players became eligible and Henry, 9-3 on the field but 6-6 legislatively, battled all the way to the San Diego Section semifinals before bowing to Oceanside, 14-0.

QUID PRO QUO?

Coach Roy Engle’s Hoover Cardinals lost their last seven games of 1973, scored all of seven points in 1974, and were working on a 18-game losing streak after a 21-20 loss to San Diego.

But the Cardinals caught a forfeit break, thanks to the Cavers.  Hoover finally scored a victory on the field when it defeated St. Augustine, 22-8, a month later.

Not quite.  Another ineligibility.  St. Augustine got the  win.

NO GOOD DEED UNPUNISHED

The newspaper headline said, “Edens Feels Sting Of Own Prep Project.”

Point Loma coach Bennie Edens was instrumental in developing the city’s overtime rules which rewarded the team with the most yards gained during the extra session.

Bennie more or less blamed students.

Bennie more or less blamed students.

Madison was given a 1-0 victory over Point Loma when the  tie-breaker was used for the first time in the season’s Week 8.

The defeat knocked Point Loma out of contention for a San Diego Section playoff berth and kept Madison in the hunt for a Western League championship.

Edens’ colleagues in the city voted, 8-2, to change the tie-breaking rules.  In answer to a mail poll, 10 County coaches voted for the California Tie-Breaker, in which each team gets four downs, starting at the 40, alternating plays.

San Diego Section squads would use the California Tie-Breaker beginning  in 1976.

WHAT’S THAT, BENNIE?

Edens exonerated his kin when discussing the forfeit frenzy:

“It’s never pleasant to win or lose by forfeit.  While we all hate the concept of a forfeit you have to have rules, not so much for the coaches, but for the students who might take advantage.”

SHACKLETT AND MORSE CONNECT

John Shacklett’s fourth season at Morse did not portend greatness.

The Tigers were only 14-20-3 as Shacklett was building a program in his first three seasons but they came from behind to defeat Patrick Henry, 14-9, for the Eastern League title and their 10-1 finish this season signaled the beginning of a remarkable, quarter-century run for Shacklett and the players he coached at the Skyline Drive campus.

Morse defense swarmed Patrick Henry's Steve Fairchild in Eastern showdown.

Morse defense swarmed Patrick Henry’s Steve Fairchild in Eastern showdown.

From 1975-99 Morse was 207-67-6, for a .742 winning percentage. Shacklett’s teams won five Section titles in eight appearances and his 1990 squad, perhaps the best ever assembled in San Diego, was No 1 in Southern California, No. 2 in the state and No. 4 in the country.

Demographic change struck quickly and devastatingly at Morse around  the Millenium.

Bad coaches will lose with good players.  Good coaches, as was Shacklett, will not win with bad players.  The talent pool at Morse shrank.

Shacklett was 8-31 in his last four seasons but finished with 229 victories, fourth highest total in San Diego County history.

MARCUS ALLEN ARRIVES

Crawford led Lincoln, 3-0, deep into the fourth quarter.

From Steve Brand’s game account on Oct. 18, 1975:

“Lincoln coach Vic Player inserted 6-foot, 180-pound sophomore Marcus Allen with only 3:30 to play.

“Allen hit Matthew Santos for a 38-yard gain to the Crawford 25.  Four (sic) plays later, Lincoln had gained only one yard.  Allen seemed trapped on what surely would have been Lincoln’s last play.  He scrambled loose, passing the ball to Santos on the one.”

Mild controversy on the play.

Crawford’s Dennis Uhle, who earlier had intercepted two of starter Lederer Hampton’s passes, stepped in front of Santos and thought he had an interception, but referee Gary Todd, a Crawford graduate, ruled simultaneous catch.

Lincoln retained the ball and scored on the next play to win, 7-3.

The Hornets would enjoy a great ride with Allen, as would USC and two NFL teams in a 15-year, Hall of Fame career.

YOU’RE OFFSIDE

A Bonita Vista security guard would not allow a car to park in the restricted upper level of a garage at Southwestern College, where the Barons were scheduled to play Castle Park.

The driver patiently explained to the guard who he was, that traffic had made him late, and that he desperately needed to park in the more accessible space.

The security guard, perhaps flushed with authority, denied the request and the now pissed off and irate visitor was forced to park on the street, a hundred yards away.

The inconvenienced driver happened to be a member of the four-man game officiating crew.

The game official and his colleagues didn’t take it out on  the host Barons or their parking garage enforcer.

Bonita Vista was penalized 10 yards to Castle Park’s 90.

For Castle Park coach Gil Warren, the garage incident was the beginning of a bad evening.

Warren’s Trojans fell behind, 20-0, but rallied with three touchdowns in the fourth quarter to go ahead, 27-20, and then apparently stopped a Bonita drive at Castle Park’s 40 yard line.

Don Slater (left) made big catch and Chris Daily was defensive standout for Barons.

Don Slater (left) made big catch and Chris Daily was defensive standout for Barons.

Holding, Castle Park.

Fifteen-yard penalty.

Given life, Bonita’s Russ Palser connected with Don Slater for a 25-yard touchdown pass with 25 seconds left in the game.

ESCHEWS TWO-POINTER

Barons coach Jan Chapman kicked for the one-point PAT and the game ended in a 27-27 tie.

Chapman’s reason against going for a two-point conversion and victory  was that, with one point, Bonita would clinch at least a tie for the Metropolitan League championship that could be outright if Castle lost one of its last two league games.

The teams finished tied with 6-0-1 records, but Bonita Vista was given the league’s top seeding in the playoffs, with Castle Park second.

“We feel we should have been number one,” said Warren, “but anytime you have a vote of coaches personalities get involved.  The principals vote, but the coaches tell them how to vote.”

Castle Park had a five-point advantage in comparative league scores, 215-121 to 151-62.

Both teams won opening playoff games but were eliminated in the quarterfinals.

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Kearny beat Mount Miguel, 20-6, in the first round of the playoffs and Matadors quarterback Steven Slater was sacked three times and intercepted thrice.

Jimbo Harris helped Kearny advance past Mount Miguel and defender Jeff Anderson.

Jimbo Harris helped Kearny advance past Mount Miguel and defender Jeff Anderson.

“He’s like I am,” said Slater’s father, Birt, the coach at Kearny, after Steven angrily pulled away from dad after the game.  Steven was not, as Michael Grant of the Union wrote, “interested in some parental consolation.”

“We’re both pretty competitive and he’s ticked off,” said Birt. “He wanted to win as badly as I did.”

Steven scored Mount Miguel’s only touchdown.

TAKE THE THREE

Field goals were becoming more and more a part of the landscape.  La Jolla’s Dick O’Neil, who toed a 37-yarder with 16 seconds remaining to give La Jolla a 17-14 win over Coronado, was tied for the state lead with 10 for the season.

German exchange student Jens Halle of Fallbrook kicked a 25-yarder in the first American football game he ever saw or was part of, and scored Fallbrook’s first points of the season.

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND…

Pat Roberts’ Grossmont team was going to play Granite Hills on the Foothillers’ “home” field, Helix.

“I feel guilty about taking my kids over there to play,” said Roberts.  “It’s a terrible disgrace to high school football.”

Roberts asserted that “I must have thrown 15 rocks off the field, all about seven inches in diameter,” the previous week, when Grossmont topped Helix, 42-14.

So as not to think Roberts was dumping on hated-rival Helix, Roberts widened his scope of criticism.

“There aren’t any good fields in the league,” he said, also putting the knock on Granite Hills’ Valley Stadium and lighted venues at Monte Vista, El Capitan, and Mount Miguel.

Roberts, 77-52-7 in 14 seasons from 1968-81 with one championship and two appearances in the finals, may have been taking an oblique shot at his Grossmont School District bosses.

Like, why can’t we have lights?

The Foothillers predated Helix as the oldest school in the district, having opened in 1920, while the Highlanders came along in 1951 and had their own, campus facility by 1954.

Grossmont continued to travel to Helix and to Aztec Bowl for home games with an occasional afternoon tussle on its campus.

QUICK KICKS

Tyler suited El Camino to a T.

Tyler suited El Camino to a T.

El Camino’s Toussaint (Tootie) Tyler was named after the man who freed Haiti of Napoleon’s rule:  Pierre-Dominique Toussaint l’Overture…Tyler’s 168 rushing yards were the difference in Oceanside’s 25-14 victory over Granite Hills for the CIF title…Losing teams made the playoffs for the first time…Fallbrook was 4-5 and Patrick Henry was 4-5, although 7-2 on the field…Patrick Henry quarterback Steve Fairchild went on to play at Colorado State, was head coach at his alma mater, and also coached in NFL…Official attendance at the championship in San Diego Stadium was 9,200…writers had estimated the turnout at 13,000..Morse’s starting backs, Eddie Ford, Charles Crews, Delvin Barnett, and Barry Alexander, called themselves the “Four Horses”…St. Augustine’s 422 points allowed was a San Diego Section record, topping the 357 of Mount Miguel in 1970…the show must go on?  Because of rain vendors refused to sell game programs at playoffs between Castle Park and Morse and Patrick Henry and Bonita Vista…La  Jolla Country Day dropped football and wouldn’t field a team again until 1981…Chula Vista’s Bob Korzep would remember his first coaching victory, 14-7 over Marian, in which the Spartans intercepted 9 passes and Oscar Ohnessorgen returned one for a 100-yard touchdown…With quarterback Mark Malone leading the way, El Cajon Valley won its first league championship since the school opened in 1955…Russ Boehmke, 10-5-1 in two seasons as Lincoln’s quarterback in 1956-57, guided Valhalla to an upset win over Helix and a 3-4-1 record in the Norsemen’s first varsity season….

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2015, Week 10: Komets Come Out of Coma

Business has picked up at Kearny, where the Komets have won three in a row and can finish the regular season with their best record since 2011.

Takoda Browne, who has scored touchdowns by running, receiving,  kickoff, punt, and pass interception returns, and two-point conversion attempts,  leads the San Diego Section with 23 touchdowns and 142 points in eight games.

Kearny is 4-5 and can clinch the Central League championship in two weeks against Clairemont. The Komets have as many victories this season as they had during a 4-24 stretch that began in 2012 after an 8-3, league-championship 2011 season.

AIR CORYELL?

Not quite, but Mike Lewis, the executive director at Helix who stepped in when head coach Troy Starr was forced to withdraw from Friday’s game because of a health issue in his family, is the son-in-law of the late and iconic San Diego State Aztecs and Chargers coach Don Coryell.

Lewis, who had previous assistant coaching experience in the Grossmont League,  guided the Highlanders to a 42-14 victory over Valhalla.

QUICK KICKS

Oceanside’s three-game losing streak is the longest for the Pirates since they dropped three in a row in the middle of the 2005 season…Carlsbad’s 21-6 triumph was its first over Oceanside in 10 years and clinched at least a tie for the Avocado West title…the Lancers are 3-0 in league play and 5-3 overall…Helix’ Nate Stinson is second in the San Diego Section to Takoda Browne with 114 points…St. Augustine’s Elijah Preston follows with 110…Valley Center’s  28-17 win over Rancho Buena Vista gave Jaguars coach Rob Gilster 193 career wins, tying Gilster with Dick Haines for ninth place…Christian’s double-overtime, 13-6 win over Morse clinched a tie for the City League championship….

Week 10 poll, after nine weeks of games:

# Team (1st place votes) Points W-L Previous
1.  Mission Hills (20) 234 8-0 1
2. Helix (4) 218 6-1 2
3. St. Augustine 196 6-2 3
4. La Costa Canyon 144 6-2 6
5. Westview 110 7-1 4
6. Rancho Bernardo 101 6-2 7
7. Madison 98 6-2 8
8. Mission Bay 53 8-0 9
9. Cathedral 52 4-4 5
10. Grossmont 40 7-1 10

NR–Not ranked. Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes (record & points in parenthesis): Carlsbad (5-3, 28), San Marcos (6-2, 15),  Bonita Vista (6-2, 13),  Mater Dei  (7-1, 10), Christian (6-2, 3), Valhalla (6-2, 3),  Granite Hills (7-1, 2), El Camino (5-3, 1), Mira Mesa (6-2, 1), Eastlake (4-5, 1).

24 Media and CIF representatives vote each week: John Maffei (U-T San Diego), Steve Brand, Terry Monahan, Don Norcross, Jim Lindgren, Tom Saxe, Rick Hoff (U-T San Diego correspondents), Bill Dickens, Chris Davis (East County Sports.com), Steve (Biff) Dolan,  (Mountain Country 107.9 FM), John (Coach) Kentera, Ted Mendenhall, Bob Petinak (The Mighty 1090), Rick Willis, Brandon Stone (KUSI-TV), Rick Smith (partletonsports.com), Jerry Schniepp, John Labeta (CIF San Diego Section), Bodie DeSilva (sandiegopreps.com), Drew Smith (sdcoastalsports.com), Lisa Lane (San Diego Preps Insider), Raymond Brown (sdfootball.net), R. Pena, C. Smith and Montell Allen (MBASports-SDFNL Magazine).

 

 

 

 

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2015: State Division Rankings Improve for Locals

Action above, including Long Beach Poly’s 52-6 loss to Concord De La Salle, has resulted in Mission Hills and Helix getting another boost in Cal-Hi Sports newsletter’s unofficial, weekly state rankings by division.

Mission Hills is 10th and Helix 11th in Division I, partly because Poly dropped from eighth to 13th.  The Grizzlies and Highlanders were 12th and 13th, respectively, last week, and have been inching up almost each week for the last month.

Other San Diego Section teams:

D-II

St. Augustine (6-1) remained sixth.  Cathedral (4-3) is 11th, and Westview  (7-0) 12th. Idle last week, Cathedral dropped from 10th and Westview rose from 15th.

D-III

Mission Bay (7-0) is on the bubble.  The rankings for D-III and lower are 1 through 10, with bubble teams following.

D-IV

Mater Dei, 7-0 on the field but 6-1 legislatively after losing a game because of a player’s ineligibility, and Santa Fe Christian (6-1) are on the bubble.

D-V

La Jolla Country Day (6-1) moved from fourth to third.  Simi Valley Grace Brethren (7-0) and Temecula Linfield (6-1) rank 1-2.

Division nomenclature is different in the San Diego Section, i.e., Mission Hills, Helix, Westview, Cathedral, and St. Augustine are in I, Mission Bay in  II.  The teams in IV and V are slotted the same by the newsletter.

 

 

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1973: Back to the Future

Two, eight-team upper and lower brackets made for the largest postseason in San Diego Section history.

What had gotten into the CIF bosses?

They had repeatedly recited the dubious mantra that the playoffs made the season too long and were a “major” reason for bolting the Southern Section.

To win a Southern Section championship, teams would have to play as many as four playoff games, adding a month to the football season, although San Diego teams seldom played beyond the second round of games.

The most notable result of the San Diego Section’s formation in 1960 was that a champion would be decided in a postseason of two weeks. Four of 21 AA teams, 19 per cent, made the playoffs.

By 1965 only seventeen per cent of 35 AA clubs were in the postseason.  One playoff involving two teams decided the A winner.

Complaints from coaches, fans, and media grew, as many teams with good records were not invited.

MORE THE MERRIER?

The CIF began to fudge on its original argument.  Slowly the number of teams qualifying for the second season began to rise.

The bosses gerrymandered the final week of regular-season schedules in 1966 by having two teams compete in a “play-in” game, the winner going to the postseason, although playoffs remained at two weeks.

The CIF created the unpopular double champions format in 1967.  “Metropolitan Conference” and “County Conference” winners were crowned. Nine of the 37 AA schools, 24 per cent, made the playoffs. The postseason still was two weeks.

The two-conference format also was in effect in 1968 and 1969, but a third postseason week between the conference winners was added.  Escondido, 10-1-1, and San Diego, 8-3-1, tied for the championship, 21-21.

Champions from 1969 forward would play 12 games, the same as San Diego in 1916, ’55, and ’57 Southern California playoff seasons.

(The regular season in most leagues had gone from 8 to 9 games in 1964.  The Grossmont League stayed at eight until 1970, the schools in that circuit having played in the game-counting, money-making carnival through 1969).

CHANGE ACOMING

By 1972 there were 51 football-playing clubs and the postseason included 8 of the 40 AA squads, still just 20 per cent.

The floodgates opened this year.

Kearny's Ron Means gives self a salute after one of his four touchdowns in finals victory.

Kearny’s Ron
Means gives self a salute after one of his four touchdowns in finals victory.

Sixteen teams, representing 35 per cent of the 43 AA teams went to the postseason.  A single contest decided the A champion.

Thirteen games and four weeks to decide a champion.  Things were back to the way they were.

CITY SETS PACE                                                                                                                       Seedings for the playoffs were done by a coaches’ committee and evoked none of the usual complaints.

The four semifinalists, Kearny, Patrick Henry, Sweetwater, and San Marcos, had a combined record of 38-3-2.

Kearny shut out Sweetwater, 34-0, in one semifinal and then took out Patrick Henry, 35-13, in the finals. It was the first time in eight seasons that Komets coach Birt Slater did not lose in the first round.

A 28-14 victory over Point Loma in the regular season was Slater’s 100th.  He became the third, after Jack Mashin and Chick Embrey (see below), to reach that mark.

GROWTH =MORE LEAGUES

The Avocado and Metropolitan leagues were bulging.  The Eastern and Western Leagues lacked symmetry, thus a new circuit, the AA Coast, was created.

The city’s Eastern and Western League now listed six teams each. The Avocado reduced from nine to seven and the Metropolitan from nine to eight.  The Grossmont League stayed at eight.

The Coast, with Coronado at the South end and San Dieguito and Poway in the North, would last only three years.

Coronado, buffeted by small enrollment for years in the Metropolitan League, now traveled 30 miles to Poway and 28 miles to San Dieguito and still faced schools with double its number of students.

How the changes went down:

Team 1973 League 1972 League
Coronado Coast Metropolitan
San Diego Western Eastern
Mission Bay Coast Western
La Jolla Coast Western
Poway Coast Avocado
San Dieguito Coast Avocado

DAY, YEA, NIGHT, NAY

San Diego’s population had risen from 573,000 in the 1960 census to about 735,000.   The County total was almost 1.4 million.  Twenty-one schools not part of the original San Diego Section football lineup were now in business.

The growth strengthened the CIF, but the bosses were having a difficult time getting their hands around a spike in rowdyism and violence at game sites.

Stop and frisk wasn‘t part of the solution, but, following the lead of other major cities, an unpopular decision was made.

“Night football and basketball games in the San Diego City School District will end with this season’s athletic schedules, school officials announced yesterday,” wrote The San Diego Union education writer Ray Kipp.

The vote of 4-1 gave school district superintendent Tom Goodman authority to schedule night athletic events to afternoon competition, wrote Kipp.74headline1022150001

The reason was violence at events.

A specious argument was that the “growing unavailability of fields” and a desire to “conserve energy” influenced the board’s action .

(The long waits and gasoline shortage that hounded Americans in 1973 would be ended when the oil-rich middle east countries lifted a ban on oil exportation to the U.S. in March, 1974).

The night-games ban came despite protests by students and adults who opposed any change without in-depth studies and potential effects on school spirit, game revenues, and the opportunity to attend afternoon contests.

In response, school board member Louie Dyer said, “If people really want to go to an afternoon game, they will.”

Board member Richard Johnston voted against the measure, citing the punishment that would be inflicted on students by the action of nonstudents.

Only one of 12 speakers appearing before the board voiced support for the change.

PAOPAO AS IN POW!

Anthony Paopao would have been welcome in the company of Frank Gansz’ special teams players on the Super Bowl 34-champion St. Louis Rams of 1999.

Paopao embodied the espirit and toughness that Gansz, a Naval Academy graduate and pilot, rewarded on Mondays following games in that memorable season.

Make a play, show toughness and desire, and a deserving Rams player would receive a baseball cap inscribed “Warrior Elite”.

It was ultimate praise and those recognized wore the headwear with pride.

Gansz would have been a PaoPao fan.

Oceanside coach Herb Meyer continually called PaoPao’s number in the playoffs against Mission Bay and the 190-pound junior responded again and again on the soggy, rain-dampened Simcox Field.

PaoPao touched the ball on 68 percent of the Pirates’ offensive plays, scored from 18 and 15 yards, including the come-from-behind, 13-10 game winner in the fourth quarter, and rushed for 213 yards in 41 carries.

BUCCANEERS REVIVED                                                                                    

The playoff loss was disappointing but didn’t dim a gratifying year for Mission Bay.

Three seasons and a 2-25  record that included 18 losses in a row were staring at coach Al Lewis when practice began at the Pacific Beach school in September.

Lewis, who started the football program at Point Loma’s Cal Western University in 1957, had succeeded Bill Hall at the Grand Avenue location in 1970.

It helped that the Buccaneers moved this year from the Western to the less competitive Coast League.

A 7-2 regular-season record tied the 1958 squad for the most successful in school history and earned the Bucs the first Coast League championship and their first playoff invitation since the 1954 inaugural varsity season.

Lewis was 31-50-2 overall but 29-25-2 from 1973 until he stepped down after the 1978 season.

EMBREY TIES MASHIN

Ladimir (Jack) Mashin, who coached at Grossmont from 1923-47, had held the County record for most coaching victories since he retired after the 10-1 campaign of 1947.

Mashin was 121-65-15 (.639) and figured at the start of this season to be caught by Escondido’s Chick Embrey, who had fashioned a 118-45-4 record since becoming head coach in 1956.

Embrey didn‘t catch Mashin until the Cougars’ eighth game and passed him in the final game of a 3-6 disapointment by defeating Fallbrook, 23-6.

Mashin, 75, whose record was later amended to 125-66-19 (.640),  still was active, assisting the weight men (shot put, discus) on the Grossmont College track team.  He expounded on the modern game.

“There are 4-4-2-1 and 4-5-2 defenses and you get stunting and all that which you never had when I was coaching.” Mashin told Will Watson of The Union.

“I wish I was coaching under the present system, where you could see games on TV. If I were a coach today I’d be glued to the TV.

“Of course,” Mashin added, “in my day there was no TV, so we tried to go to as many coaching clinics as we could.”

John Perry (left) joined retired coaches Jack Mashin (center) and Bill Bailey in perusing newly-published copy of Evening Tribune prep football record book in 1965.

John Perry (left) joined retired coaches Jack Mashin (center) and Bill Bailey in perusing newly-published copy of Evening Tribune prep football record book in 1965.

PERRY SUCCUMBS

John Perry, the 78-year-old former coach at San Diego and Hoover, died Oct. 21 from injuries sustained in an auto accident on Sept. 10 near his retirement home on San Diego’s Bankers Hill.

Perry, who never played football, learned the game by reading football books and printed pamphlets, and traveling hundreds of miles to attend clinics.

Perry coached at San Diego from 1920-26, winning a Southern California title in 1922 and earning a trip to the finals in 1925.

Perry left coaching but returned and built the Hoover program from scratch in 1930 and led the Cardinals to their first victory over San Diego in  1935.

“He was a great coach and a great personal friend,” Bert Ritchey, the star of the 1925 squad, told Bill Center of The Union. “We all knew he never played, but he was one man with no playing experience who could teach it.”

“He wasn’t only a coach, he was like a father to us,” said Roy Engle, who scored the touchdown in Hoover’s  7-6,  first win over the Cavemen .  “It was John who turned my eyes to a coaching career.”

Perry was 52-14-5 at San Diego and 40-34-6 from 1930-39 at Hoover.

MIKE MORROW, TOO

The San  Diego sports world was saddened again seven weeks later when Dewey J. (Mike) Morrow the nationally renowned San Diego high coach and peer of John Perry, passed away at 75.

Morrow coached 10 Southern California baseball championship teams and the only San  Diego County team to win a Southern California major division championship in basketball, in 1935-36.

QB AS SPORTS WRITER

Kearny junior Don Norcross, who led the County with 1,270 passing yards, was destined for a career as a sports staff ace for the Union-Tribune.

Norcross entered the season as the only question mark on a loaded Kearny squad.  “Sure, I felt the pressure,” he said. “It was like, ’If Kearny doesn’t make it, it will be Norcross’ fault.’”

SHORT BUT NOT SMALL

Player-of-the-year Ed Imo was the 5-foot-9, 230-pound  line-plugging nose tackle for the Komets’ defense.

Imo went on to star at San Diego State and later became the physical education/athletics department chairman in American Samoa,

“Had I played against him, I would have spent a lot of time face-first into the grass,” said Norcross.

Ed Imo had another distinction at San Diego State, the shortest name in Division I football, five letters.

RED DEVILS BEDEVILED

Sweetwater’s 27-game Metro League winning streak, which began in 1969 after a 41-0 loss to Castle Park, ended in a 12-8 loss to the Trojans.

AND BEYOND

Future NFL standouts included St. Augustine wide receiver Tim Smith, Kearny defensive back Lucious Smith, Castle Park defensive back John Fox, who became an NFL head coach; El Cajon Valley quarterback Mark Malone, and Hoover defensive lineman Bill Gay.

San Diego’s Michael Hayes, who led the County with 1,418 yards rushing, including 858 in his last four games, did not play in the NFL but was one of the all-time great San Diego running backs.

Hayes was just warming up.  He’d be the San Diego Section player of the year in 1974 and was named to the second all-time, all-County team in 2013.

CAVEMEN COLLAPSE DESPITE HAYES’ HEROICS

Hayes was a one-man show against Point Loma, scoring three touchdowns and gaining 223 yards in 28 carries, but his team offered no defense against Point Loma.

The Pointers’54-28 victory over  San Diego represented the most points allowed by the Cavemen since a 56-0 loss to the Stanford University freshmen in 1923.  Point Loma’s John Finley  scored four touchdowns and gained 123 yards in 22 attempts.

Jeff Carlile (75) serves as cushion for Point Loma's John Finley, who scores one of four touchdowns against San Diego.

Jeff Carlile (75) serves as cushion for Point Loma’s John Finley, who scores one of four touchdowns against San Diego. Finley’s 99 season points were second in San Diego Section.

QUICK KICKS

.Hoover coach Roy Engle had to devise a defense for the Crawford quarterback, the position played by his son, David…Carlsbad snapped an 0-6-1 stretch against Oceanside, 17-8…Lincoln did not kick a point after touchdown or field goal all season…Cleon Gilliam, who caught 8 passes for 157 yards in Patrick Henry’s title-game loss to Kearny, is son of Earl Gilliam, a federal judge from San Diego who started on San  Diego High’s 1947 team that went to the Southern California finals…Bill Casper, Jr., son of the former U.S. Open golf champion Billy Casper, was a star lineman  for Hilltop….

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2015, Week 9: Move Over, Dick Haines

Valley Center’s Rob Gilster can tie Dick Haines this week for ninth place among the winningest coaches in  San Diego Section history.

The 32-21, Valley League  victory over Fallbrook last week was Gilster’s 193rd.  The veteran mentor moved from 11th to 10th place earlier this season when he passed Carl Parrick with victory No. 191.

Gilster is second to the 203 victories of Monte Vista’s Ron Hamamoto among active coaches.  Mission Bay’s Willie Matson is third with 177.

Gilster, in his 18th season with the Jaguars after nine at Orange Glen, has an all-time record of 193-120-5 for a .615 percentage. Haines, who also coached several years in Ohio, was 194-85-1 (.695) in 25 seasons at Vista.

Next up for Valley Center is a nonleague tussle Friday at Rancho Buena Vista.

GOLDEN YEAR FOR VALLEY LAYOUT

Dr. George Brown, examining future NFL lineman Claudie Minor, who also served as team physician at San Diego State and was leader of push for Granite Hills' Valley stadium.

Dr. George Brown, examining future NFL lineman Claudie Minor in 1973, served as team physician at San Diego State and was leader of push for Granite Hills’ Valley stadium.

Granite Hills recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of Valley Stadium. When the facility was dedicated in October, 1965, the Eagles and Helix were the only schools with  lighted fields in the East County.

The Eagles defeated Castle Park, 33-7, in the inaugural game.  One of Granite’s standouts was George Brown, who scored a touchdown in that game and was one of the state’s leading shotputters during the spring track season.

Brown’s father, Dr. George Brown, a star at Hoover in the late ‘thirties and an all-America lineman at the Naval Academy before concluding his football career at postwar San Diego State, led the drive to build the facility.

Meanwhile, coach Kellan Cobbs’ 2015 team improved to  6-1, the best record since the 1994 team was 6-1 en route to a 9-3 finish.

GRIZZLIES MARCH ON

Mission Hills continues to hold sway in the weekly Union-Tribune poll. Westview now is fourth behind the big three of ‘Hills, Helix, and St. Augustine.  Madison and Mission Bay made their first appearances in the top 10.

Week 9 poll, after eight weeks of games:

# Team (1st place votes) Points W-L Previous
1.  Mission Hills (20) 239 7-0 1
2. Helix (4) 219 5-1 2
3. St. Augustine 193 5-2 3
4. Westview 163 7-0 5
5. Cathedral 101 4-3 9
6. LaCosta Canyon 85 5-2 4
7. Rancho Bernardo 75 5-2 10
8. Madison 63 5-2 NR
9. Mission Bay 45 7-0 NR
10. Grossmont 28 6-1 7

NR–Not ranked. Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes (record & points in parenthesis): Carlsbad (4-3, 23), Valhalla (6-1, 20), Bonita Vista (5-2, 14), San Marcos (5-2, 13), Mater Dei  (6-1, 12), El Camino (5-2, 11), Oceanside (4-3, 8), Granite Hills (6-1, 4), Poway (4-3, 3), Christian (5-2, 1), University City (6-1, 1).

24 Media and CIF representatives vote each week: John Maffei (U-T San Diego), Steve Brand, Terry Monahan, Don Norcross, Jim Lindgren, Tom Saxe, Rick Hoff (U-T San Diego correspondents), Bill Dickens, Chris Davis (East County Sports.com), Steve (Biff) Dolan,  (Mountain Country 107.9 FM), John (Coach) Kentera, Ted Mendenhall, Bob Petinak (The Mighty 1090), Rick Willis, Brandon Stone (KUSI-TV), Rick Smith (partletonsports.com), Jerry Schniepp, John Labeta (CIF San Diego Section), Bodie DeSilva (sandiegopreps.com), Drew Smith (sdcoastalsports.com), Lisa Lane (San Diego Preps Insider), Raymond Brown (sdfootball.net), R. Pena, C. Smith and Montell Allen (MBASports-SDFNL Magazine).

QUICK KICKS

Were it not for  the ubiquitous,  dreaded administrative glitch, Mater Dei would be 7-0, matching the 13-0 team of 2003 for best start in school history…the Crusaders were forced to forfeit a Week 2 victory over El Capitan after discovery of  an ineligible player…Calexico Vincent Memorial, with a win this week, can match the 2002 club’s 8-0 start…Vinnie, Westview, and Mission Bay are the only 7-0 squads in the San Diego Section…Mar Vista’s and Santa Fe christian’s 6-1 starts are the best for each since 2011……University City is 6-1 for the first time since 2006….

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2015: Rick (Red) Hill, Longtime San Diego Sports Figure

Richard Morgan Hill, 62, passed away recently at Grossmont Hospital.

Few people would recognize the name.  He preferred being called Rick but was even better known to a couple generations of fans and media around here as “Red” Hill.

Helix High  coach Mike Muirhead introduced me to this Tom Sawyer-looking teenager  in 1970, when I still was covering high school track for the Evening Tribune and Rick was a fledgling journalist for the school’s Highland Fling newspaper.

Rick wasn’t cut to be a television anchor man or radio sportscaster, but that didn’t stop him from becoming an important and respected contributor on the San Diego sports beat.

“I first met Rick in ‘seventy-two,” remembered Union-Tribune writer John Maffei, then the sports information director at San Diego State. “He just came into my office and offered his services.

“I used him to get tape of coaches and players and we put it on a hot line (which people would call for updates on the Aztecs sports teams).

“One of the truly honest guys I’ve ever known,” said Maffei.  “He would do anything for you and never asked for anything in return.”

Three time zones away, in West Palm Beach, Florida, retired radio sports anchor and Chargers broadcaster John DeMott was moved to post on Facebook:

I first met Rick in the early seventies. He was just a kid out of school. He loved sports and he worked so dilligently to become a peer of the San Diego sports media. He did anything and everything he could to find his niche.

“Rick decided he would fill the need for every thankless chore he could think of. He chased tape in locker rooms and at press conferences. He lugged equipment at remotes. He earned part-time pay from about every broadcast outlet that did sports, and for some of the teams as well.

“It got to a point where we all took Red Hill for granted, which I believe is exactly what he hoped would be the case,” DeMott wrote.  “The number of folks who Chris Binkowski tells us were at his memorial last night proves that. He was Red Hill and he was one of us. RIP, Rick.”

“The turnout for his service–Chargers, Padres, USD, San Diego State, radio, and TV people were there–can tell you how many people he touched in his life,” said Maffei.

Red traveled with the Chargers, covered  Super Bowls, and every big, San Diego-linked sports event during his time.

I used to make a simple announcement on the stadium press box microphone for many years during my time with the Chargers.  It was more like a brief page: “Red Hill.”

Although Hill was not a fan of the nickname,  he knew that we all respected him for what he worked so hard to  become, a professional.

 

 

 

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2015, Week 8: Mission Hills Takes Over North County

Wither, Oceanside?

The 45-0 loss to Mission Hills last week shook the foundation of the dynastic program at the school overlooking the intersection of old U.S. 101 and Interstate 5.

It’s one thing to get blown out, but even in losses the Pirates have usually managed to score. Their dominance in  the  North County, though being challenged the last few years by onrushing Mission Hills, hasn’t been in question.

The loss marked  the Pirates’ first shutout  to a North County team in 130 games. Carlsbad blanked them, 28-0, in 2005.  No North County squad had scored that many points in 152 games.  Fallbrook ran off with  a  51-28 victory in 2003.

There have been occasional whopping defeats–El Camino routed John Carroll’s 1991 team, 63-27, for example, but the highest shutout margin had been 39-0 by Carlsbad in 1979.

Margins like 45-0 haven’t been accomplished by San Diego Section teams in 89 years. There were losses to Metropolitan League rivals Coronado, 47-0, and Sweetwater, 57-0, in 1926, the Oceanside’s first football season.

The Pirates will attempt to get their swashbuckling groove on this week against 1-5 Torrey Pines.  Mission Hills probably will run the table in the regular season if it gets past Rancho Bernardo.

Coach Chris Hauser’s Grizzlies close versus weak Del Norte, pedestrian Vista, and better-than-average San Marcos, a 28-10 loser to Oceanside in the opening game.

Mission Hills’ victory kept the Grizzlies atop the weekly Union-Tribune voting and they picked up two additional first place votes that had been held by Helix, which defeated Steele Canyon, 41-6.

Some shakeups above raised Mission Hills a notch to 14th in the Cal-Hi Sports state rankings.  Helix follows at 15th.  Cathedral, La Costa Canyon, and St. Augustine are among 30 others on the bubble.

Week 8 poll, after seven weeks of games:

# Team (1st place votes) Points W-L Previous
1.  Mission Hills (20) 239 6-0 1
2. Helix (4) 219 4-1 2
3. St. Augustine 191 4-2 4
4. La Costa Canyon 161 5-1 6
5. Westview 123 6-0 7
6. Oceanside 88 4-2 3
7. Grossmont 79 6=0 10
8. El Camino 77 5-1 5
9. Cathedral 67 4-3 9
10. Rancho Bernardo 31 4-2 8

NR–Not rated. Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes (record & points in parenthesis): Madison (4-2, 14), Mission Bay (6-0, 13), Mt. Carmel (5-1, 8), Bonita Vista (4-2, 7), Mater Dei  (4-1, 5),  San Marcos (4-2, 4), Valhalla (5-1, 4), Mater Dei (5-1, 3).

24 Media and CIF representatives vote each week: John Maffei (U-T San Diego), Steve Brand, Terry Monahan, Don Norcross, Jim Lindgren, Tom Saxe, Rick Hoff (U-T San Diego correspondents), Bill Dickens, Chris Davis (East County Sports.com), Steve (Biff) Dolan,  (Mountain Country 107.9 FM), John (Coach) Kentera, Ted Mendenhall, Bob Petinak (The Mighty 1090), Rick Willis, Brandon Stone (KUSI-TV), Rick Smith (partletonsports.com), Jerry Schniepp, John Labeta (CIF San Diego Section), Bodie DeSilva (sandiegopreps.com), Drew Smith (sdcoastalsports.com), Lisa Lane (San Diego Preps Insider), Raymond Brown (sdfootball.net), R. Pena, C. Smith and Montell Allen (MBASports-SDFNL Magazine).

SERRA LOOKS TO SERGIO

Sergio Diaz has built a program before.  He was 41-47-1 in eight seasons at Scripps Ranch, but 34-25 in his last five after a 7-22-1 start.

Diaz faces a challenge seemingly more daunting at Serra, in his first head coaching job since he left Scripps Ranch after the 2009 season.

The Conquistadors are 0-6 and have been outscored, 316-13.

QUICK KICKS

La Costa Canyon is 5-1 for the first time since 2009, when coach Darrin Brown’s Mavericks raced to an 11-0 mark before getting the big haircut from Vista, 47-7, in the Division I Section championship…Eastlake is 2-4 after a bitter-pill, 28-23 loss to Bonita Vista…the Titans were 9-0 against the Barons since 2006 and the 2-4 start is their poorest since the 1997 team broke from the gate 2-4…Westview continues to roll, its 6-0 beginning is the best since the ’08 club was 7-1 and finished 9-3….

 

 

 

 

 

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2015: Week 7, Real Racing To Begin

Nonleague and intersectional games just about out of the way, 16 of the San Diego Section’s 19 leagues swing into action this week.

The Eastern, Metro Pacific and Metro South Bay tee up next week.

El Camino, 5-0, for the first time since 2000 in the days when Herb Meyer had the Wildcats on an 18-game winning streak, takes on La Costa Canyon, at 4-1, same as in 2014 before a 9-5 loss to El Camino signaled a flattening out to 6-6.

El Camino finished with a 10-3 record in 2000, unequaled since.  The winner of this Avocado West opener will feel pretty good about itself as it points to a late-season game with Oceanside.

The Pirates, 4-1 in their first season since 1988 without coach John Carroll holding sway, visit Mission Hills (5-0) in the annual, nonleague Battle of Highway 78.

Oceanside has come along well since a 49-13 loss to Washington power Sammamish Eastside Catholic in the season’s second game.  First-year coach Dave Rodriguez rallied the Pirates to victories over San Pasqual, Temecula Chaparral, and Rancho Buena Vista.

Westview should determine whether its contending or pretending, taking its 5-0 record  to Rancho Bernardo, which is 4-1 and the probable favorite in the Palomar circuit.

The Union-Tribiune poll this week revealed promising  matchups:   No. 1 Mission Hills and 3 Oceanside,  5 El Camino and 6 La Costa Canyon, and 7 Westview and  8 Rancho Bernardo.

DONS ON LONG TRIP

Cathedral has one more intersectional on its schedule, this week at Damonte Ranch of Reno, Nevada.

Coach Sean Doyle’s Dons are 3-3, with all losses to Cal-Hi Sports‘ state-ranked teams.

The Damonte Mustangs are 1-4, losing to Carson City Carson, 17-14;  Reno, 14-13; Placer of Auburn, California, 41-26, and Sparks Edward Reed, 58-39.  Damonte defeated Reno North Valleys, 52-6.

Week 7 poll, after six weeks of games:

# Team (1st place votes) Points W-L Previous
1.  Mission Hills (18) 233 5-0 1
2. Helix (6) 219 3-1 2
3. Oceanside 174 4-1 4
4. St. Augustine 171 4-2 3
5. El Camino 141 5-0 5
6. La Costa Canyon 109 4-1 6
7. Westview 76 5-0 8
8. Rancho Bernardo 69 4-1 7
9. Cathedral 54 3-3 10
10. Grossmont 45 5-0 NR

NR–Not rated. Points awarded on basis of 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.

Others receiving votes (record & points in parenthesis): Madison (3-2, 19), Mission Bay (5-0, 8), Mater Dei  (4-1, 5), Eastlake (2-4, 5),  5 each; Mt. Carmel (3-1, 3), Bonita Vista (3-2, 2), San Marcos (3-2, 1), Christian (3-2, 1),  Valhalla (4-1, 1).

24 Media and CIF representatives vote each week: John Maffei (U-T San Diego), Steve Brand, Terry Monahan, Don Norcross, Jim Lindgren, Tom Saxe, Rick Hoff (U-T San Diego correspondents), Bill Dickens, Chris Davis (East County Sports.com), Steve (Biff) Dolan,  (Mountain Country 107.9 FM), John (Coach) Kentera, Ted Mendenhall, Bob Petinak (The Mighty 1090), Rick Willis, Brandon Stone (KUSI-TV), Rick Smith (partletonsports.com), Jerry Schniepp, John Labeta (CIF San Diego Section), Bodie DeSilva (sandiegopreps.com), Drew Smith (sdcoastalsports.com), Lisa Lane (San Diego Preps Insider), Raymond Brown (sdfootball.net), R. Pena, C. Smith and Montell Allen (MBASports-SDFNL Magazine).

SAINTS FALL SHORT AGAIN

Strong Vista Murietta hung on for a 36-34 victory over St. Augustine, the Saints’ second intersectional loss.  The other was 23-20 to state-ranked Los Angeles Loyola.

St. Augustine dug itself an 0-14 hole in the first quarter, got close at 17-14, fell behind, 36-21, and battled back with a chance at a two-point conversion that would have tied the game with 4 seconds remaining.

Saints coach Richard Sanchez took a stand.

Sanchez benched a star running back and several others in the first quarter after the players missed a scheduled school event.  Sanchez last year did not dress two of his best players at Loyola after they were disciplined for engaging in a “food fight”.

Young men will be young men.

MISSION HILLS, HELIX MOVE UP AGAIN

When No. 8 Sacramento Grant was beaten last week, the Pacers’ loss was Mission Hills’ and Helix’ gain.

Rankings in Cal-Hi Sports this week had the Grizzlies 14th in the state and Helix 15th.  St. Augustine, La Costa Canyon, and Oceanside are “on the bubble”.

 

 

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2015: Website Readers Are Correct About NFL

Two readers of our website looked at our table showing  13 San Diego Section high school graduates in the NFL and found a couple glaring errors.

The NFL list of 1,696 players also included safety Tony Jefferson of Eastlake and kicker Jason Myers of Mater Dei, which we missed.

We also were alerted  to Larry Warford, but Warford graduated from high school in Kentucky after two years at Oceanside and was not identified as being from this area.

Two great running backs, Cathedral’s Tyler Gaffney and Escondido’s Ricky Seale, are getting paid by NFL teams, but Gaffney is on Injured Reserve with New England, and Seale was a game-day deactivation for Buffalo on opening weekend.

The annual NFL list includes the 32 teams’ 53-man active rosters on opening day.  So Gaffney and Seale, and possibly others, were not acknowledged.

The revised list with 15 names and a Partleton thanks to Greg Durrant, Richard Porter,  and Deontae Patterson:

Name Position High School Team Year College
Khalif Barnes T Mount Miguel Oakland 11 Washington
Sam Brenner T Oceanside Miami 3 Utah
Reggie Bush RB Helix San Francisco 10 USC
Nate Chandler T Mira Mesa Carolina 5 UCLA
Arian Foster RB Mission Bay Houston 7 Tennessee
Leon Hall CB Vista Cincinnati 9 Michigan
Tony Jefferson S Eastlake Arizona 3
Levine Toiolo TE Helix Atlanta 3 Stanford
Jason Myers K Mater Dei Jacksonville  1 Marist
Brian Schwenke C Oceanside Tennessee 3 California
Alex Smith QB Helix Kansas City 11 Utah
Kenny Stills WR La Costa
Canyon
Miami 3 Oklahoma
Jamar Taylor CB Helix Miami 3 Boise State
Damien Williams RB Mira Mesa Miami 3 Oklahoma
Jimmy Wilson S Point Loma San Diego 5 Montana

GRIZZLIES AND HIGHLANDERS RATE

Mission Hills is 14th and Helix 15th in Division I in Cal-Hi Sports‘ weekly Top 10.

St. Augustine is sixth and Cathedral 10th in II.  Rancho Bernardo is on the bubble in II and Christian (III) and The Bishop’s (IV) are other bubble teams.

At the end of the regular season teams will be seeded for the state playoffs, possibly 1-25 from the North and 1-25 from the South.

According to commissioner Jerry Schniepp, the six division champions from San Diego will be invited from the South, along with 13 from the Southern Section and the rest from the L.A. City and Central Sections.

Section divisions will not be in play when the game pairings are formulated.

 

 

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